How much water should I drink each day?

Your body needs water to work properly: about 5 pints spread over the day. It helps the brain to work properly and carries nutrients throughout your body in the blood.

Water makes up about two-thirds of the weight of a healthy body. Most of the chemical reactions that happen in our cells need water in order to take place. We also need water so that our blood can carry nutrients around the body and get rid of waste. It can also make your skin clearer and hydrate the roots of your hair.

5 pints works out at around eight 200ml glasses of water spread throughout the day.

Facts

  • all non-alcoholic drinks count, but water, milk and fruit juices are the healthiest.
  • water has no calories and contains no sugars that can damage teeth.
  • in hotter climates, the body needs more water than this.

Source: Water and drinks @ NHS Choices

Read more

  • Just how much water should you drink a day? @ Daily Mail

    Excerpt: If you drink enough your energy levels will be more consistent (say goodbye to that after-lunch snooziness or end-of-the-day crabbiness); many of the people who ask me for advice also find that their concentration improves. It helps to stagger your water intake throughout the day rather than going for hours without anything, then downing half a litre – if you do this your kidneys will struggle and you’ll find yourself dashing to the loo.

  • How much water should you drink each day? @ WikiAnswers

    Excerpt: Water is your body’s principal chemical component, making up, on average, 60 percent of your body weight. Every system in your body depends on water. For example, water flushes toxins out of vital organs, carries nutrients to your cells and provides a moist environment for ear, nose and throat tissues. Lack of water can lead to dehydration, a condition that occurs when you don’t have enough water in your body to carry out normal functions. Even mild dehydration can drain your energy and make you tired.

Image: Water Impact 0 by (Henningklevjer) - (Henningklevjer). Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons.