Don't compare yourself to others

Instead of comparing yourself to others – especially people you think of as being better/smarter/more beautiful than you in some way – compare yourself to your past self. See how you are a different person, how you have grown and how you do things differently now to how you did 3 or 5 years ago.

What are your wins this year, compared to last year at this time? How has your life improved? How have you improved? What have you done recently that you never thought you could do?

What negative behaviour have you stopped engaging in, that you never thought you could quit? What positive behavior have you been engaging in that up until now, you have resisted?

Source: Stop comparing yourself to others: an alternative to competing with people @ Tiny Buddha

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  • Stop comparing yourself to others: an alternative to competing with people @ Tiny Buddha

    Excerpt: The thing about comparison is that there is never a win. How often do we compare ourselves with someone less fortunate than us and consider ourselves blessed? More often, we compare ourselves with someone who we perceive as being, having or doing more. And this just leaves us coming up short. But our minds do want to quantify. Our minds want to rank and file and organize information. Our mind wants to know where we fit into the scheme of things. So we need to give it something to do. So, instead of training it to stop comparing altogether, why not simply redirect the comparison to a past and a present self – and keep the comparison within?

  • How to Stop Comparing Yourself to Others (and Stop Feeling Lousy About Yourself and Your Life) @ The Positivity Blog

    Excerpt: Compare yourself to yourself. This habit has the benefit of creating gratitude, appreciation and kindness towards yourself as you observe how far you have come, the obstacles you have overcome and the good stuff you have done. You feel good about yourself without having to think less of other people.

Image by Azoreg (Own work by uploader) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons